Adult volunteers take on a new town

23 February 2015

Two friends from Derbyshire are joining forces to take over an Army Cadet Force (ACF) detachment in Draycott.

Second Lieutenant Sarah Shergold, Detachment Commander at Hallcroft detachment, and Probationary Instructor Amy Owen, from Ilkeston detachment, are set to take over Draycott detachment in March, where they hope to inspire the next generation of Cadets. 

Sarah, aged 23, and Amy, aged 19, began their Cadet careers together at Long Eaton detachment and have since gone on to volunteer as adult instructors.

Sarah, who has been in the ACF for 11 years, said: “I am really excited to get started and hope that with the help of the team around us, we can make the detachment a success and make the Cadets proud.

“I have had the opportunity to pick up lots of different ideas during my time in the Cadet Force, so I am thrilled to have been selected to use my experience to lead a new generation of Cadets. Being a Cadet means you’ll have the chance to take part in lots of activities you may not have had the opportunity to do before such as adventurous training and work towards a range of qualifications.”

Sarah and fellow volunteer Amy have been selected to take on the detachment because of their enthusiasm towards mentoring and guiding young people.

The pair hope to have 15 Cadets regularly parading by the end of the year and taking part in events such as the local carnival and drill displays as well as attending this summer’s annual camp which is set to be held at Longmoor National Park.

Probationary Instructor Amy Owen, who will join Sarah at the detachment, said: “This is a brand new challenge for me having only been an adult instructor since December 2013. I hope to be able to inspire young people the way that I felt inspired was when I was a Cadet.”

Amy, who works as a Learning Support Assistant at a primary school in Sandiacre, added: “I am looking forward to building the detachment up from the ground and working hard to use my teaching and leadership skills to help the Cadets grow into young adults. Skills such as First Aid, leading a team and navigation are life skills that will stay with them for a long time.

“On many occasions young people who join the ACF can be shy and a little unsure of themselves when we first meet them, but after joining our activities it’s great to see the same young person start to flourish into a confident outgoing individual. The benefits of being an adult volunteer are huge, both personally and professionally, I’m always learning new skills and there are many crossovers between my ACF and civilian career. I would recommend joining the ACF as an adult to anyone who is looking for a new challenge.”