At the detachment

A typical week at the detachment

Detachments normally meet on 1 or 2 nights per week, with occasional weekend activities. Below is an example of a typical week:

Example evening 1

7pm

Doors open

7.10pm

A senior cadet checks the turnout of her fellow cadets.

7.20pm

The first parade of the evening at which the Detachment Commander inspects the cadets then tells them what activities they will be doing for the next hour.

7.30pm

The adults decide to take the junior cadets outside for their first aid lesson, while the senior cadets head to the detachment's indoor range to train for next weekend's county shooting competition.

8.20pm

The second parade involves some drill practice and notices about the second lesson.

8.30pm

Off to the canteen where cadets' parents run the tuck shop

8.40pm

The junior cadets stay in the drill hall for a session designed to help develop their navigation and communication skills. Obstacles have been set up around the drill hall using furniture and other objects.   One cadet wears a blindfold while the other cadets on his team shout instructions to help him navigate his way across the room. The senior cadets split into two groups. Half refresh their map and compass skills so they are ready to help run the field exercise later in the week while the rest have a lesson in first aid as they work towards their next qualification

9.20pm

The final parade of the evening where any notices or county orders are given to the cadets.

9.30pm

The cadets are dismissed for the night. The adults stay behind for 10-20 minutes to discuss the evening and any other items coming up.

Example evening 2

Everyone gathers at the detachment at 7pm dressed in their military uniform. After a kit inspection and notices they are off in the minibus to a nearby Army training ground for a field training exercise. ‘Camcream' applied and a safety brief undertaken, the exercise is soon underway. While the adult volunteers play the role of the enemy, the senior cadets remind the juniors of the basics of personal camouflage, then teach them how to both move as an individual and work as a member of a section in the field. By the time the exercise is over an hour or so later, everyone is exhausted but happy, and the juniors are well on their way to the next star level.

Example Saturday training

A small team of senior cadets head off to the county shooting competition, each hoping to be selected as a member of the county team that will eventually compete in the national tri-service full-bore competition at Bisley in July. Last year the County's Cadet Regimental Sergeant Major was selected to join the Great Britain Under-19 team on its annual trip to compete in South Africa. Needless to say, all the cadets competing today are hoping to follow in her footsteps.